taxa profiles

List of Conservation Summaries

On this page is a full list of the conservation summaries of Australian extinct and endangered birds.

They are listed in the taxanomic order used by Christidis and Boles (2008).
Use the sort function to change this order.

The list uses the bird's common name, click on the name to reveal a brief summary and click view to see the full profile.

Use the filters to narrow the list; to ensure accuracy use the reset button after applying multiple filter criterion.

Southern Cassowary (Australian)
Southern Cassowary (Australian)

Vulnerable A2c

Historical declines in habitat over the last three generations are thought to have caused a loss greater than 30% of the population in the last three generations (37.5 years), but the population is now almost stable.

Emu (Tasmanian)

Extinct

This subspecies was last seen in the wild in 1865

King Island Emu

Extinct

This species was probably extinct by 1805

Kangaroo Island Emu

Extinct

This species was probably extinct by 1827

Malleefowl
Malleefowl

Vulnerable A2bce

Estimated population decline of 30-49% over the last three generations (48 years) based on counts of active mounds and habitat availability

Cape Barren Goose (south-western)

Vulnerable D1

Population less than 1,000 mature individuals at more than 5 locations and not declining.

Blue-billed Duck
Blue-billed Duck

Near Threatened C1

Population may be as low as 10,000 and monitoring suggests it may be declining by as much as 10% within 3 generations (18 years)

Red-tailed Tropicbird
Red-tailed Tropicbird

Near Threatened A3be+4be

Declines likely in largest population on Christmas Island from cat and rat predation, suspected declines on Raine I. of 20-29% in three generations (39 years)

White-tailed Tropicbird (Christmas Island)

Endangered B2ab(v)

Single endemic population breeds in an area of 10-500 km², predation by Black Rats and cats probably reducing population, which may also be being depleted by hybridization

White-tailed Tropicbird (Indian Ocean)

Endangered D

Population 50-250 mature individuals

White-throated Pigeon (Lord Howe Island)

Extinct

The last individual of this subspecies was recorded in 1853

Emerald Dove (Christmas Island)

Near Threatened D2

Occurs at single location where susceptible to introduction of predators, competitors or disease, although the risk is now considered low

Partridge Pigeon
Partridge Pigeon

Vulnerable A2bc+3c+4c

Decline greater than 30% at several monitored sites, probably as a result of change in fire regime, possibly also from predation by feral cats

Partridge Pigeon (western)

Vulnerable C2a(ii)

Population less than 10,000 mature individuals and suspected continuing decline, probably as a result of a change in fire regime, possibly combined with introduced predators

Partridge Pigeon (eastern)

Vulnerable A2bc+3c+4c

Decline greater than 30% at several monitored sites, probably as a result of change in fire regime, possibly also from predation by feral cats

White-quilled Rock-Pigeon (Stokes Range)

Near Threatened B1ab(ii,iii,v)+2ab(ii,iii,v), C2a(ii)

Increased fires across its very small range are suspected to be causing a continuing decline in area occupied, habitat quality and number of mature individuals, and number of locations may approach 10

Norfolk Island Ground-Dove

Extinct

The last individual of this species was recorded in 1800

Christmas Island Imperial-Pigeon

Near Threatened D2

Present only at only one location with a plausible but low probability threat

New Zealand Pigeon (Norfolk Island)

Extinct

Last individual recorded in 1900

Glossy Swiftlet (Christmas Island)

Near Threatened D2

Present only at only one location with a plausible but low probability threat

Matsudaira's Storm-Petrel

Vulnerable D2

Present at two sites (outside Australia) where introduction of exotic predators represents a plausible threat

Wilson's Storm-Petrel (subantarctic)

Vulnerable D2

Present at two locations where there is a plausible threat of introduction of predators

Grey-backed Storm-Petrel

Endangered B2ab(iii), C2a(i), D

AOO less than 500km², at no more than 5 locations and habitat declining in quality, Population less than 2,500, largest subpopulation less than 250 and probably declining, population less than 250

White-bellied Storm-Petrel (Tasman Sea)

Vulnerable D2

Small population at 5 locations with plausible future threat

Wandering Albatross
Wandering Albatross

Critically Endangered B2ab(ii,iii), D

Population occurs at a single location where habitat quality declining and the area occupied possibly contracting as a result of rabbit grazing, population less than 50 mature individuals

Tristan Albatross

Critically Endangered A4ade

Population decline greater than 80% in three generations (75 years) occurring as a result of at-sea mortality associated with fisheries, particularly longline fishing vessels, as well as predation at its breeding islands

Antipodean Albatross (Auckland Islands)

Endangered A4ad

Population decline 50-79% in three generations (82 years) occurring as a result of at-sea mortality associated with fisheries, particularly longline fishing vessels

Northern Royal Albatross
Northern Royal Albatross

Endangered A4bc, B2a+b(iii,v)

Population decline greater than 50-79% in three generations (81 years) thought to be occurring as a result of reduced breeding success following storm damage to principal breeding site

Southern Royal Albatross

Vulnerable D2

Occurs at no more than 5 locations with plausible future threat

Black-browed Albatross
Black-browed Albatross

Endangered B2ab(ii,iii)

Population occurs at only four locations where the habitat quality is declining as a result of rabbit grazing and the area occupied is probably contracting

Campbell Albatross

Vulnerable D2

Occurs at no more than 5 locations, with pausible future threat

Shy Albatross

Vulnerable D2

Occurs at only three locations the smallest of which faces a plausible future threat from competition with Australasian Gannets Morus serrator and rough weather.

White-capped Albatross

Vulnerable D2

Occurs at no more than 5 locations with pig predation a plausible threat to one location

Salvin's Albatross

Vulnerable A4bd

Population decline 30-49% possibly occurring as a result of mortality associated with fishing

Grey-headed Albatross

Critically Endangered B2ab(ii,iii)

Population occurs at a single location where the habitat quality is declining as a result of rabbit grazing and the minute area occupied is probably contracting

Indian Yellow-nosed Albatross
Indian Yellow-nosed Albatross

Endangered A4bde

Population declines 50-79% in three generations (72 years) occurring as a result of at-sea mortality associated with fisheries, particularly longline fishing vessels

Buller's Albatross

Near Threatened D2

Breeds at 4 locations (outside Australian territory) which have been damaged by storms historically but there are no current threats, and future human or stochastic events are unlikely to make the species Extinct or Critically Endangered in a short time

Buller's Albatross (southern)

Near Threatened D2

Breeds at 2 locations (outside Australian territory) which have been damaged by storms historically but there are no current threats, and future human or stochastic events are unlikely to make the species Extinct or Critically Endangered in a short time

Buller's Albatross (northern)

Near Threatened D2

Breeds at 3 locations (outside Australian territory) one very small. There are no current threats, and future human or stochastic events are unlikely to make the species Extinct or Critically Endangered in a short time

Sooty Albatross

Endangered A4bd

Population declines 50-79% in three generations (90 years) occurring as a result of at-sea mortality associated with fisheries, particularly longline fishing vessels

Light-mantled Albatross

Endangered B2ab(ii,iii)

Population occurs at just two locations, habitat quality on Macquarie Island is deteriorating and the area occupied is probably contracting

Blue Petrel
Blue Petrel

Critically Endangered B2ab(iii,v)

Australian population breeds in area of less than 10 km² at one location and continuing decline likely until rabbits and predators removed

Antarctic Prion

Endangered B2ab(iii,v)

Present at only two locations at one of which rapid decline likely because of predators and rabbits

Fairy Prion (southern)

Endangered D

Population less than 250 mature individuals

Fulmar Prion (southern)

Vulnerable D2

Present at one location where the introduction of predators is a plausible future threat

White-chinned Petrel

Vulnerable A4bcde

Ongoing population decline of 30-49% in three generations (74 years)

Westland Petrel

Vulnerable D2

Present at one site (outside Australia) where development nearby represents a plausible future threat

Black Petrel

Vulnerable D2

Present at two sites (outside Australia) where introduction of exotic predators represents a credible threat

Grey Petrel

Endangered B3ab(iii)

Population occurs at single location where habitat quality declining area occupancy probably contracting due to grazing by rabbits and subsequent predation. May be Critically Endangered but some evidence of genetic exchange with extralimital non-threatened population so downlisted one level

Buller's Shearwater

Vulnerable D2

Present at two sites (outside Australia) where introduction of exotic predators represents a plausible future threat

Flesh-footed Shearwater
Flesh-footed Shearwater

Near Threatened A2bc

Population decline may be approaching 30% in 3 generations (55 years) from loss of breeding habitat and because often caught as bycatch by longline fishing and may be affected by pollution

Sooty Shearwater

Near Threatened A2de+3de+4de

Population decline may be following global trend of close to 30% in 3 generations (61 years)

Hutton's Shearwater

Endangered B2ab(ii,iii)

Present at two locations (outside Australia) where the breeding sites are threatened by trampling by introduced herbivores

Little Shearwater (Tasman Sea)

Vulnerable D2

Present at four locations, introduction of exotic predators represents a plausible future threat

Tahiti Petrel

Near Threatened A2bde+3bde+4bde, B2ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v)

Present at multiple locations in south Pacific Ocean (outside Australia), but totalling a small area, where exotic predators and development probably causing declines approaching 30% in 3 generations (53 years)

Tahiti Petrel (Pacific)

Near Threatened A2bde+3bde+4bde, B2ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v)

Present at multiple locations in south Pacific Ocean (outside Australia), but totalling a small area, where exotic predators and development probably causing declines approaching 30% in 3 generations (53 years)

Tahiti Petrel (New Caledonian)

Near Threatened A2bde+3bde+4bde, B2ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v)

Present at multiple locations near New Caledonia (outside Australia), but totalling a small area, where exotic predators and development probably causing declines approaching 30% in 3 generations (53 years)

Kermadec Petrel (western)

Endangered D

Population 50-250 mature individuals

Herald Petrel

Vulnerable D1+2

Australian breeding population - almost certainly contains fewer than 50 mature individuals but, because demonstrably not genetically isolated from a much larger Least Concern global population, downgraded two categories to Vulnerable

Soft-plumaged Petrel

Critically Endangered D

Australian breeding population - population less than 50 mature individuals

White-headed Petrel

Endangered B2ab(iii,v)

Australian breeding population - present only at one Australian site that is affected by rabbit grazing

Providence Petrel

Vulnerable D2

Present only at only two Australian sites with a plausible threat of the loss of one location

Mottled Petrel

Near Threatened A2e+3e+4e, B2ab(iv)

Population declining at 20-29 in three generations(47 years) because of predation by exotic predators at some of the small breeding sites near New Zealand
Pycroft's Petrel

Extinct

Birds thought to be in this species were last recorded on Norfolk I. in about 1800. On Lord Howe I., the species is known only from subfossils

Gould's Petrel

Vulnerable B2ab(v), D2

Breeding sites (outside Australia) are small and few in number and there is ongoing loss of birds to introduced predators, even though the population in Australia is increasing

Gould's Petrel (New Caledonian)

Vulnerable B2ab(v), D2

Breeding sites (outside Australia) are small and few in number and there is ongoing loss of birds to introduced predators

Gould's Petrel (Australian)

Vulnerable D2

Occurs at no more than 5 locations where there are plausible future threats

White-necked Petrel (southern)

Endangered D

Population 50-250 mature individuals, some genetic mixing so could be downgraded but global population also threatened

Common Diving-Petrel (southern)

Vulnerable D2

Present at two sites, introduction of exotic predators represents a plausible future threat

South Georgian Diving-Petrel

Vulnerable D2

Present at two sites, introduction of exotic predators represents a plausible future threat

Gentoo Penguin (subantarctic)
Gentoo Penguin (subantarctic)

Near Threatened A2bc+3bc+4bc

Australian population not monitored but assumed to be following trend of global population - occurs at only 2 locations but no known current site-based threats

Southern Rockhopper Penguin (eastern)

Vulnerable A2bc+3bc+4bc

Australian population likely to be declining along with the global population - global declines of greater than 30% within 3 generations (34 years) have occurred and are thought likely to continue, it is assumed because of changes in habitat

Macaroni Penguin

Near Threatened A2bc+3bc+4bc

Australian population assumed to be following global trends; occurs at only 2 Australian locations but no plausible future threat to those locations

Royal Penguin

Near Threatened D2

Present only at only one location with a plausible but low probability threat from marine pollution

Christmas Island Frigatebird

Critically Endangered B2ab(ii,iii,v)

Breeding colonies occupy about 1.7 km² at one location, and there is a continuing decline likely in area of occupancy, area and quality of habitat, and number of mature individuals as a result of storms and/or weed invasion

Abbott's Booby

Endangered B2ab(ii,iii,v)

Occupies only 25 km² at a single location with a continuing decline likely in area of occupancy, area and quality of habitat, and number of mature individuals, largely from the ongoing effects of past clearing for mining

Masked Booby (Tasman Sea)

Near Threatened D2

Present only at only 2 locations with plausible but low probability future threat

Imperial Shag (Heard Island)

Near Threatened D2

Present only at only one site with a plausible but low probability threat from marine pollution

Imperial Shag (Macquarie Island)

Vulnerable D1

Vulnerable - 250-1,000 mature individuals

Australasian Bittern

Endangered C1

Population less than 2,500 and surveys indicate a decline of greater than 20% within 2 generations (11 years)

Letter-winged Kite

Near Threatened D1

Fluctuating population that may approach 1,000 individuals in the poorest years

Brown Goshawk (Papuan)

Near Threatened D1

Australian population probably small enough for Endangered D but not isolated from Least Concern main population in New Guinea, so downgraded two categories to Near Threatened (following IUCN 2003)

Variable Goshawk (Christmas Island)

Endangered D

Population 50-250 mature individuals

Red Goshawk
Red Goshawk

Near Threatened C2a(i), D1

Population estimated at about 1,400 mature individuals in at least 2 subpopulations and possibly declining

Wedge-tailed Eagle (Tasmanian)

Vulnerable D1

Population 250-1,000 mature individuals

Grey Falcon

Vulnerable D1

Population may be fewer than 1,000 individuals

White Gallinule

Extinct

Last recorded in 1788

Lewin's Rail (Tasmanian)

Vulnerable C2a(ii)

Population probably less than 10,000 mature individuals, in a single sub-population and declining

Lewin's Rail (Western Australian)

Extinct

There have been no records of this subspecies since 1932, despite intensive surveys

Buff-banded Rail (Cocos Keeling Islands)

Vulnerable D1+2

Population 250-1,000 mature individuals in one location, exotic predator introduction is a plausible future threat

Buff-banded Rail (Macquarie Island)

Extinct

This subspecies was last recorded in 1879

Lord Howe Woodhen
Lord Howe Woodhen

Endangered D

Population less than 250 mature individuals

Black-faced Sheathbill (Heard Island)

Vulnerable D1

Population probably less than 1,000 mature individuals

Grey Plover

Near Threatened A2bc+3c+4bc

Past, recent and ongoing decline of 30-49% in 3 generations (22 years) based on survey data and habitat loss. 

Lesser Sand Plover (Mongolian)

Endangered A2bc+3c+4bc

Past, current and anticipated declines of 50-79% over periods of 3 generations (24 years) based on survey data and habitat loss

Lesser Sand Plover (Kamchatkan)

Endangered A2bc+3c+4bc

Past, current and anticipated declines of 50-79% over periods of 3 generations (24 years) based on survey data and habitat loss

Greater Sand Plover (Mongolian)

Vulnerable A2bc+3c+4bc

Past, recent and ongoing declines of 30-49% in 3 generations (24 years) based on survey data and habitat loss

Hooded Plover
Hooded Plover

Vulnerable C1

Population less than 10,000 individuals with an estimated ongoing decline of 10-20% in 3 generations (39 years)

Hooded Plover (eastern)
Hooded Plover (eastern)

Vulnerable C1+2a(ii)

Population less than 10,000 individuals in a single subpopulation with an estimated ongoing decline of 10-20% in 3 generations (39 years)

Hooded Plover (western)
Hooded Plover (western)

Vulnerable C2a(ii)

Population less than 10,000 mature individuals a single subpopulation with a suspected ongoing decline

Plains-wanderer

Endangered C2a(ii)

Single declining sub-population less than 2,500 mature individuals when at its lowest during droughts

Australian Painted Snipe
Australian Painted Snipe

Endangered C2a(ii)

Population 250-2,500 and occurs as a single subpopulation that is declining owing to ongoing loss and degradation of wetlands

Black-tailed Godwit (eastern Siberian)
Black-tailed Godwit (eastern Siberian)

Near Threatened A2b

Declines of 20-29% over last three generations (26 years) based on survey data

Bar-tailed Godwit (western Alaskan)
Bar-tailed Godwit (western Alaskan)

Vulnerable A3c+4bc

Suspected recent and ongoing declines of 30-49% in 3 generations (29 years) based on survey data and habitat loss

Bar-tailed Godwit (northern Siberian)

Vulnerable A3c+4bc

Suspected recent and ongoing declines of 30-49% in 3 generations (29 years) based on survey data and habitat loss

Whimbrel (eastern Siberian)

Near Threatened A3c+4bc

Suspected recent and ongoing declines of 20-29% over 3 generations (27 years) based on survey data and habitat loss

Eastern Curlew
Eastern Curlews

Vulnerable A2bc+3c+4bc

Past, recent and ongoing declines of 30-49% in 3 generations (30 years) based on survey data and habitat loss

Grey-tailed Tattler

Near Threatened A2b

Declines of 20-29% over three generations (25 years) based on survey data

Ruddy Turnstone (Palaearctic)

Near Threatened A2b

Past decline in flyway estimated at 30-49% in 3 generations (25 years) based on survey data. However non-declining populations in other flyways are not phenotypically differentiated, suggesting genetic interchange, so downgraded to Near Threatened

Asian Dowitcher

Near Threatened A3c+4c, C2a(ii), D1

Small Australian population unlikely to exceed 1,000 nature individuals, possibly declining along with global population which is Near Threatened based on habitat loss. As species is not threatened in Australia, Australian status downgraded to global status

Great Knot

Vulnerable A3c+4bc

Recent and ongoing declines of 30-49% in three generations (26 years) based on survey data and habitat loss

Red Knot (New Siberian Islands)

Vulnerable A3c+4bc

Recent and ongoing declines of 30-49% in 3 generations (23 years) based on survey data and habitat loss

Red Knot (north-eastern Siberia)

Vulnerable A3c+4bc

Recent and ongoing declines of 30-49% in 3 generations (23 years) based on survey data and habitat loss

Curlew Sandpiper
Curlew Sandpiper

Vulnerable A2bc+3c+4bc

Past, recent and ongoing declines of 50-79% in 3 generations (23 years) based on survey data and habitat loss.

Black-breasted Button-quail

Near Threatened B2ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v)

EOO may be less than 20,000 km² and AOO may be less than 2,000 km² and continuing decline in EOO, AOO, area of habitat, no. locations and no. mature individuals but does not fluctuate and uncertainty about whether fragmented - birds probably move between locations

Buff-breasted Button-quail

Endangered B2ac(ii)

Very small AOO and probably at no more than 5 locations on average, this probably fluctuates greatly depending on annual variations in the pattern of burning. Ongoing decline possible as burning patterns have changed but uncertain so criteria do not include B2b

Painted Button-quail (Houtman Abrolhos)

Endangered B1ab(v)+2ab(v), C2a(ii)

Occurs at only two locations and population at one location severely reduced with potential for local extinction

Lesser Noddy (Houtman Abrolhos)

Endangered B2ab(iii,v)

Total area occupied is less than 1 km² but spread across 3 locations, despite inter-annual variation, ongoing declines in number of mature individuals are probable.

Fairy Tern
Fairy Tern

Vulnerable C1

Population less than 10,000 mature individuals and monitoring suggests an ongoing decline likely to exceed 10% in three generations (33 years)

Fairy Tern (New Caledonian)

Endangered D

Australian population less than 50 mature individuals. Probably not isolated from global population based in New Caledonia so downgraded, even though that population too is Endangered

Fairy Tern (Australian)

Vulnerable C1

Population less than 10,000 mature individuals and monitoring suggests an ongoing decline likely to exceed 10% in three generations (33 years)

White-fronted Tern
White-fronted Tern

Near Threatened D1

Population less than 1,000 mature individuals, at few locations but currently no plausible future threats to nest sites. Downgraded two levels because of the high probability of genetic exchange with large Least Concern global population

Antarctic Tern (New Zealand)
Antarctic Tern (New Zealand)

Endangered D

Australian population less than 250 mature individuals

Antarctic Tern (Indian Ocean)
Antarctic Tern (Indian Ocean)

Endangered D

Australian population less than 250 mature individuals

Norfolk Island Kaka

Extinct

The last individual of this subspecies died in 1851

Palm Cockatoo (Australian)
Palm Cockatoo (Australian)

Vulnerable C2a(ii), E

Population less than 10,000 mature individuals in a single sub-population that modelling suggests is undergoing a continuing decline

Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo (south-eastern)
Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo (south-eastern)

Endangered C2a(ii)

The single subpopulation contains less than 2,500 mature individuals and a continuing decline probable given ongoing loss of habitat and low recruitment

Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo (south-western)
Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo (south-western)

Vulnerable A2c+3c+4c

An inferred decline in the population of 30-49% in the last three generations (58 years) as a result of habitat loss which is probably continuing as a result of loss of nesting hollows from competitors (bees, other cockatoos) and fire

Glossy Black-Cockatoo (Kangaroo Island)
Glossy Black-Cockatoo (Kangaroo Island)

Endangered D

Population less than 250 mature individuals

Glossy Black-Cockatoo (south-eastern)

Near Threatened C2a(ii)

Population possibly as few as 10,000 mature individuals and declining, nearly 100% in largest subpopulation but small potentially isolated population is know from NSW Riverina

Carnaby's Black-Cockatoo
Carnaby's Black-Cockatoo

Endangered A2bcde+3bcde+4bcde

Rapid decline greater than 50% in last 3 generations (58 years) likely to continue, based on sample counts, area of occupancy and quality of habitat, nest-robbing, disease and competition

Baudin's Black-Cockatoo
Baudin's Black-Cockatoo

Endangered A3cde+4cde

Ongoing population decline estimated greater than 50% over three generations (58 years) inferred from shooting by orchardists and loss of nest hollows to bees and other cockatoos

Major Mitchell's Cockatoo (eastern)
Major Mitchell's Cockatoo (eastern)

Near Threatened A3c

Projected declines in nest hollow availability are likely to increase existing declines to a rate approaching 30% within next three generations (71 years)

Double-eyed Fig-Parrot (southern, Coxen's)

Endangered D

Very small population, so small for so long that is unlikely still to be declining

Eclectus Parrot (Cape York Peninsula)

Near Threatened D1

Population near 1,000 mature individuals given male biased sex ratio

Regent Parrot (eastern)
Regent Parrot (eastern)

Endangered B2ab(iii,v)

Probably occupies less than 500 km² scattered through 3 locations, the quality of which are declining as old trees die and habitat is over grazed

Princess Parrot

Near Threatened D1

Population possibly approaching 1,000 individuals in poor years

Green Rosella (King Island)

Vulnerable D1

Population less than 1,000 mature individuals

Swift Parrot
Swift Parrot

Endangered C2a(ii)

Fewer than 2,500 individuals, greater than 95% in largest population and still declining

Golden-shouldered Parrot
Golden-shouldered Parrot

Endangered B1ab(iii,v)

Extent of Occurrence is less than 5,000 km² at 5 locations with a continuing decline in habitat quality as grassland is invaded by ti-trees associated with a decline in nest density in parts of range

Paradise Parrot

Extinct

There have been no authenticated sightings since 1927

Tasman Parakeet (Norfolk Island, Norfolk Island Green Parakeet)

Critically Endangered B1ab(iii,v)+2ab(iii,v), C2a(ii)

There may be less than 250 mature individuals and possibly declining. One subspecies Extinct

Tasman Parakeet (Lord Howe Island)

Extinct

The last record of this subspecies was in 1869

Red-fronted Parakeet (Macquarie Island)

Extinct

 

The last individual was recorded 1890

Orange-bellied Parrot
Orange-bellied Parrot

Critically Endangered A2abc+3bc+4abc, B1ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v), C1+2a(i,ii), D, E

Very small, rapidly declining population in one small area, models suggest extinction within 10 years so decline in the wild being accelerated by capturing some juveniles to ensure genetic diversity of captive population

Western Ground Parrot

Critically Endangered A2bc, C1+2a(ii)

Population estimated at less than 250 individuals, has declined at greater than 80% in three generations (29 years) and greater than 90% in one sub-population

Eastern Ground Parrot (mainland)

Near Threatened C2a(i)

Population less than 10,000 mature individuals, declining with largest subpopulation approaching 1,000 mature individuals

Night Parrot

Endangered B2ab(iii)c(ii,iii,iv), D

Area occupied probably very small, scattered among few locations and probably fluctuates greatly with overall condition of habitat declining

Barking Owl (Papuan)

Near Threatened D1

Australian population probably small enough for Endangered D but not isolated from Least Concern main population in New Guinea, so downgraded two categories to Near Threatened (following IUCN 2003)

Barking Owl (southern)

Near Threatened A2c+3c+4c

Past, current and expected declines in habitat quality across the owl's range approach 30% over 3 generations (26 years)

Southern Boobook (Lord Howe Island)

Extinct

Last recorded in 1950s

Southern Boobook (Norfolk Island x New Zealand)

Critically Endangered D

Population less than 50 mature individuals

Christmas Island Hawk-Owl

Vulnerable D1+2

No more than 1,000 mature individuals at a single location with a plausible future threat from invasive species

Masked Owl (Tasmanian)

Endangered C2a(ii)

Population less than 2,500 mature individuals and decline in single subpopulation likely to continue

Masked Owl (northern)

Vulnerable C2a(i)

Population probably less than 10,000 mature individuals in three sub-populations, none greater than 1,000 mature individuals, with a slow but continuing decline inferred from habitat loss and degradation

Masked Owl (Tiwi Islands)

Endangered C2a(ii)

Population less than 2,500 mature individuals in a single sub-population, with a continuing decline inferred from habitat loss and degradation

Azure Kingfisher (Tasmanian)
Azure Kingfisher (Tasmanian)

Vulnerable D1

Population probably 250-1,000 mature individuals

Sacred Kingfisher (Norfolk Island)

Near Threatened D1+2

Population probably near  1,000 mature individuals in 1 location with a plausible but low probability threat

Albert's Lyrebird

Near Threatened B1ab(i,ii,iv)+2ab(i,ii,iv)

Extent of occurrence less than 20,000 km² and occupies less than 2,000 km², possibly near 10 locations, possible loss of outlying locations/subpopulations and thus extent of occurrence and area occupied

Rufous Scrub-bird

Endangered B2ab(ii,iv,v)

Occupies less than 500 km², possibly severely fragmented, evidence of reduced area occupied, loss of some locations and thus of mature individuals is declining

Rufous Scrub-bird (southern)

Endangered B2ab(ii,v)

Occupies less than 500 km², possibly severely fragmented and some evidence that the area occupied, and hence the number of mature individuals, is declining

Rufous Scrub-bird (northern)

Endangered B1ab(ii,iv,v)+2ab(ii,iv,v)

Extent of occurrence less than 5,000 km², occupies less than 500 km² and possibly severely fragmented with a continuing decline suspected in area occupied, number of locations and thus of mature individuals.

Noisy Scrub-bird

Endangered B1ab(iii,v)+2ab(iii,v)

The very small population is restricted to a very small EOO and AOO at very few locations. The recent series of large wildfires and some unexplained smaller-scale declines suggests a probable continuing decline in habitat quality and number of mature individuals

Brown Treecreeper (south-eastern)

Near Threatened A2bc+3c+4bc

Declining across a substantial proportion of its range based on surveys and local extirpations, probably at 20-29% within three generations (22 years), because of the many ongoing effects of two centuries of habitat loss and fragmentation

Fawn-breasted Bowerbird

Near Threatened C2a(ii)

Population may be less than 10,000 individuals, in a single sub-population and may be declining based on recent anecdotal reports

Purple-crowned Fairy-wren (western)
Purple-crowned Fairy-wren (western)

Endangered B2ab(ii,iii,iv,v)

The linear riparian habitat occupied is contracting and deteriorating in quality, causing declines in AOO, no. of locations, subpopulations and mature individuals

Purple-crowned Fairy-wren (eastern)
Purple-crowned Fairy-wren (eastern)

Near Threatened C2a(ii)

Population may be close to 10,000 mature individuals, largest sub-population may be close to 1,000 mature individuals, with an ongoing deterioration in habitat quality

White-winged Fairy-wren (Barrow Island)
White-winged Fairy-wren (Barrow Island)

Vulnerable D2

Occurs at single location where large-scale fire or introduction of exotic predators a plausible future threat

White-winged Fairy-wren (Dirk Hartog Island)
White-winged Fairy-wren (Dirk Hartog Island)

Vulnerable D2

Occurs at single location where large-scale fire or introduction of exotic predators a plausible threat

Variegated Fairy-wren (Shark Bay)
Variegated Fairy-wren (Shark Bay)

Vulnerable D2

Occurs at 1 or 2 locations where large-scale fire or introduction of exotic predators a plausible future threat

Southern Emu-wren (Dirk Hartog Island)

Vulnerable D2

Occurs at single location where large-scale fire or introduction of exotic predators a plausible future threat

Southern Emu-wren (Fleurieu Peninsula)

Endangered B1ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v)+2ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v), C2a(i)

Extent of occurrence less than 5,000 km² and area occupied less than 500 km², with the population of less than 2,500 mature individuals, none in a subpopulation of greater than 250 mature individuals.

Southern Emu-wren (Eyre Peninsula)

Endangered B1ab(ii,iii,iv,v)+2ab(ii,iii,iv,v), C2a(i)

Extent of occurrence less than 5,000 km² and area occupied less than 500 km², with the population of less than 2,500 mature individuals, none in a subpopulation of greater than 250 mature individuals.

Mallee Emu-wren

Endangered A2c

Population declines of 50-79% in the last 3 generations (15 years) inferred from the loss of habitat to fires

Grey Grasswren (Bulloo)

Endangered B1ab(i,ii,iii,v)+2ab(i,ii,iii,v)

Restricted to less than 5 locations across a very small EOO and AOO and with a continuing decline in habitat quality and no. individuals

Striated Grasswren (sandplain)

Near Threatened A2bc+3c+4bc

Losses and declines in central and south-east of subspecies range suggest past, ongoing and probable future declines of 20-30% in the last 3 generations (29 years), primarily from more extensive and frequent fires

Short-tailed Grasswren

Near Threatened B2ab(ii,iii,v)

Small area occupied, near 10 locations and a possible continuing decline as a result of high fire frequencies

Short-tailed Grasswren (Flinders Ranges)

Vulnerable B1ab(ii,iii,v)+2ab(ii,iii,v)

Small area occupied, less than 10 locations and a possible continuing decline as a result of high fire frequencies

Short-tailed Grasswren (Gawler Ranges)

Vulnerable D1

Population of about 900 mature individuals

White-throated Grasswren
White-throated Grasswren

Vulnerable B1ab(ii,iii,iv,v)+2ab(ii,iii,iv), C2a(i)

Population less than 10,000 with less than 1,000 in any sub-population, small AOO, severely fragmented and continuing decline in AOO, habitat quality and number of locations

Carpentarian Grasswren

Near Threatened A2c, C2a(ii)

Population has probably declined as a result of fire by 20-29% in the last 3 generations (29 years) and is now near 10,000 mature individuals, almost all in a single sub-population

Thick-billed Grasswren (MacDonnell Ranges)

Extinct

Last recorded in 1936

Thick-billed Grasswren (north-west New South Wales)

Critically Endangered D

The known population of this subspecies was only about 10 adults at the time of assessment

Thick-billed Grasswren (central New South Wales)

Extinct

Last recorded in 1886

Thick-billed Grasswren (Flinders Ranges)

Vulnerable B1ab(i,ii,iii,iv)+2ab(i,ii,iii,iv)

Extent of occurrence less than 20,000km2, area occupied less than 2,000km2, less than 10 locations and an inferred continuing decline in EOO, AOO, habitat quality, no. locations based on recent historical losses

Thick-billed Grasswren (Lake Frome Basin)

Near Threatened D1

Population size about 2,500 mature individuals

Western Grasswren (Gawler Ranges)

Vulnerable C2a(ii)

Population probably 2,500-10,000 mature individuals in a single sub-population that is declining as a result of habitat degradation

Black Grasswren

Near Threatened B1ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v)+2ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v)

Small but poorly-known EOO and AOO, possibly less than 10 locations and declining EOO, AOO and habitat quality as a result of excessive fire

Eastern Bristlebird
Eastern Bristlebird

Endangered B1ab(i,ii,iii,iv)+2ab(i,ii,iii,iv)

Extent of occurrence less than 5,000 km² and occupies less than 500 km², occurs at 5 locations.

Eastern Bristlebird (southern)

Endangered B1ab(ii)+2ab(ii)

EOO less than 5,000 km² and AOO less than 500 km², occurs at less than 5 locations and continuing decline in AOO

Eastern Bristlebird (northern)

Critically Endangered B2ab(ii,iii,iv,v), C2a(i), D

Very small fragmented population with declining numbers and a contracting range

 

Western Bristlebird

Endangered B1ab(iii)

The very small population is restricted to a very small extent of occurrence at very few locations. The recent series of large wildfires suggests a probable continuing decline in habitat quality

Rufous Bristlebird (western)

Extinct

Last recorded 1906

Scrubtit (King Island)

Critically Endangered B1ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v)+2ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v), C2a(i,ii), D

Population less than 50 mature individuals, probably declining, at a single small site that is deteriorating in condition following fires

Chestnut-rumped Heathwren (Mount Lofty Ranges)

Endangered B1ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v)+2ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v)

Extent of occurrence less than 5,000 km² and area occupied less than 500 km².

Chestnut-rumped Heathwren (Flinders Ranges)

Vulnerable D1

Probably less than 1,000 mature individuals

Rufous Fieldwren (Dorre Island)
Rufous Fieldwren (Dorre Island)

Vulnerable D2

Occurs at single location where large-scale fire or introduction of exotic predators a plausible threat

Rufous Fieldwren (Dirk Hartog Island)

Vulnerable D2

Occurs at single location where large-scale fire or introduction of exotic predators a plausible threat

Norfolk Island Gerygone

Near Threatened D2

Present only at only one location with a plausible but low probability threat

Lord Howe Gerygone

Extinct

Last recorded 1928

Slender-billed Thornbill (Gulf St Vincent)

Vulnerable B1ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v)+2ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v)

Extent of occurrence is less than 5,000 km² and birds occupy less than 500 km².

Brown Thornbill (King Island)

Critically Endangered D

Population probably less than 50 mature individuals

Chestnut-breasted Whiteface
Chestnut-breasted-Whiteface

Near Threatened C2a(i)

A single population less than 10,000 mature individuals but probably more than one subpopulation and greater than 1,000 mature individuals in smallest subpopulation.

Forty-spotted Pardalote

Endangered A2a, B2ab(ii,iii,iv,v)

Population has declined by greater than 50% in the last 3 generations (12 years), AOO less than 500 km², severely fragmented and contracting with decline in habitat quality, decline in number of individuals in existing colonies and permanent loss of some colonies

Yellow-tufted Honeyeater (Helmeted)

Critically Endangered B1ab(iii,v)+2ab(iii,v), C2a(i), D

The extent of occurrence is less than 100 km² and area occupied less than 10 km² with a severely fragmented population and a net decline in the no. mature individuals.

Black-eared Miner

Endangered A2ce, B2ab(ii,iii,iv,v), C2a(i)

Over half known population lost to fire in last three generations (21 years), integrity of taxon continues to be threatened by hybridization with Yellow-throated Miner, AOO small and contracting, small declining population with less than 1000 mature individuals in largest subpopulation

Regent Honeyeater

Critically Endangered A2b

Population thought to have declined by greater than 80% over the last 3 generations (24 years) notwithstanding recent releases of captive reared birds

Yellow Wattlebird (King Island)

Near Threatened D2

Present only at only one location with a plausible but low probability threat

Yellow Chat (Capricorn)
Yellow Chat (Capricorn)

Endangered B2ab(i,ii,iv,v), C2a(i), D

Population less than 250 mature individuals occupying less than 2,000 km² occupying less than 2,000 km² with the rapid decline of the Curtis Island population suggesting a continuing decline in extent of occurrence, area occupied, number of locations and the population size

Yellow Chat (Alligator Rivers)

Endangered B2ab(ii,iii,iv,v), C2a(ii)

Poplulation of 250-2,500 mature individuals occupying and area less than 500 km2 in a single subpopulation at less than 5 locations.

Black-chinned Honeyeater (south-eastern)

Near Threatened A2bc+3c+4bc

Declining across a substantial proportion of its range based on surveys and local extirpations, probably at 20-29% within 3 generations (21 years), because of the many ongoing effects of 200 years of habitat loss and fragmentation

Painted Honeyeater

Vulnerable C2a(ii)

Population 2,500-10,000 in a single sub-population with a continuing decline projected from habitat loss

Spotted Quail-thrush (Mt Lofty Ranges)

Critically Endangered (Possibly Extinct) D

Possibly Extinct since 1992, based on its documented decline, survey effort, and degradation of habitat, balanced against the inconspicuous nature of the species and continued existence of some potentially suitable habitat

Western Whipbird (Kangaroo Island)

Near Threatened D1

Population may be near 1,000 mature individuals in the years immediately following large fires, but evolved in the presence of very large fires and no other immediate threats

Western Whipbird (eastern)

Vulnerable B1ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v)+2ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v)

Extent of occurrence across Eyre and Yorke Peninsulas and the Murray Mallee is less than 5,000 km².

Western Whipbird (western heath)

Endangered B2ab(iii)

The very small population is restricted to a very small AOO at very few locations. The recent series of large wildfires suggests a probable continuing decline in habitat

Long-tailed Triller (Norfolk Island)

Extinct

No record since 1942

Red-lored Whistler
Red-lored Whistler

Vulnerable B2ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v), C2a(i)

Occupies a small area at no more than 10 locations which fire threatens to reduce in EOO, AOO, habitat quality, no. locations and no. mature individuals.

Golden Whistler (Lord Howe Island)
Golden Whistler (Lord Howe Island)

Near Threatened D2

Occurs only at single location where susceptible to introduction of predators, competitors or disease, although the risk is low 

Golden Whistler (Norfolk Island)

Near Threatened D2

Occurs only at single location where susceptible to introduction of predators, competitors or disease, although the risk is low

Pied Currawong (Grampians)

Extinct

Probably extinct before 1900; even when described only hybrids seem to have been present

Pied Currawong (Lord Howe Island)
Pied Currawong (Lord Howe Island)

Endangered D

Population less than 250 mature individuals

Black Currawong (King Island)

Endangered D

Population less than 250 mature individuals

Grey Fantail (Lord Howe Island)

Extinct

Last recorded in 1924

Grey Fantail (Norfolk Island)

Near Threatened D2

Occurs only at single location where susceptible to introduction of predators, competitors or disease although the risk is low

Scarlet Robin (Norfolk Island)

Endangered B1ab(ii,v)+B2ab(ii,v), C2a(ii)

Small EOO, AOO and population size, and a gradual decline in abundance that appears to be continuing

Flame Robin
Flame Robin

Near Threatened A2b

Rapid decline approaching 30% in 3 generations (19 years)

Hooded Robin (south-eastern)

Near Threatened A2bc+3c+4bc

Declining across a substantial proportion of its range based on surveys and local extirpations, probably at 20-29% within three generations (16 years), because of the many ongoing effects of two centuries of habitat loss and fragmentation

Hooded Robin (Tiwi Islands)

Critically Endangered (Possibly Extinct) D

Possibly Extinct since 1992, based on its documented decline, survey effort, conspicuous nature of the species and plausible threat of changed fire regimes, balanced against the lack of known attributes predisposing it to extinction and continued existence of potentially suitable habitat

Horsfield's Bushlark (Tiwi Islands)

Vulnerable D1

Population probably less than 1,000 mature individuals based on paucity of records and restricted habitat

Christmas Island White-eye

Near Threatened D2

Occurs only at single location where susceptible to introduction of predators, competitors or disease, although the risk is now considered low

Silvereye (Lord Howe Island)
Silvereye (Lord Howe Island)

Near Threatened D2

Occurs only at a single location where susceptible to introduction of predators, competitors or disease, although the risk is low

Robust White-eye

Extinct

Last recorded in 1918

Slender-billed White-eye

Near Threatened D2

Occurs only at a single location where susceptible to introduction of predators, competitors or disease although the risk is low

White-chested White-eye

Critically Endangered (Possibly Extinct) D

Possibly Extinct since 1979, based on its documented decline, survey effort, presence of Black Rats, balanced against the continued existence of potentially suitable habitat and difficulties with identification

Bassian Thrush (South Australian)

Vulnerable C2a(ii)

Population estimated to be less than 10,000 mature individuals and declining.

Island Thrush (Christmas Island)

Near Threatened D2

Occurs at a single location where susceptible to introduction of predators, competitors or disease, although the risk is now considered low

Island Thrush (Norfolk Island, Grey-headed Blackbird)

Extinct

There have been no records of this subspecies since 1975

Island Thrush (Lord Howe Island, Vinous-tinted)

Extinct

Last recorded in 1913

Singing Starling

Near Threatened D1

Australian breeding population probably small enough for Endangered but not isolated from Least Concern main population in New Guinea, so downgraded two categories to Near Threatened (following IUCN 2003)

Tasman Starling

Extinct

There have been no records of this species since 1923

Tasman Starling (Norfolk Island)

Extinct

Last recorded in 1923

Tasman Starling (Lord Howe Island)

Extinct

Last recorded in 1918

Black-throated Finch (southern)

Vulnerable C2a(i)

Population less than 10,000 mature individuals and continuing to decline, less than 1,000 in largest known sub-population

Crimson Finch (white-bellied)

Near Threatened D1+2

Population approaching 1,000 individuals at lowest point in year, and present at about 8 locations, all at risk from fire

Star Finch (Cape York Peninsula)

Near Threatened D1+2

Population approaching 1,000 mature individuals at lowest point in year

Star Finch (southern)

Critically Endangered (Possibly Extinct) D

Possibly Extinct since 1995, based on documented decline of range, surveys, relatively conspicuous nature of species, plausible threat of overgrazed drought refuges, balanced by lack of known attributes predisposing extinction & continued existence of potentially suitable habitat

Gouldian Finch

Near Threatened D1

Although well below historical levels, population appears to have stopped declining but may contract to near 1,000 mature individuals at the end of the dry season


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